General Business Administration (GBA)

GBA 401A. Business Consulting I. 0 credits

The First-Year Project Experience is a live project helping a client at a real organization answer an important question or achieve a significant business objective. Teams of students work together to deliver a set of well-reasoned impactful recommendations based built upon a thoughtful analysis of the relevant facts. This course is designed to provide an experiential learning opportunity through which students can develop key skill in teamwork, communication, and problem solving skills. These learning goals are supported by discussions in MGC - on the teamwork and communication aspects of the project experience; workshops on a hypothesis driven problem solving methodology used by management consultants; coaching from second year students during the experience; engaging in and refining interpersonal communication during client interactions; rehearsing and delivering the presentation of final recommendations; and reflection upon the overall experience.

GBA 401B. Business Consulting II. 3 credits

The First-Year Project Experience is a live project helping a client at a real organization answer an important question or achieve a significant business objective. Teams of students work together to deliver a set of well-reasoned impactful recommendations based built upon a thoughtful analysis of the relevant facts. This course is designed to provide an experiential learning opportunity through which students can develop key skill in teamwork, communication, and problem solving skills. These learning goals are supported by discussions in MGC - on the teamwork and communication aspects of the project experience; workshops on a hypothesis driven problem solving methodology used by management consultants; coaching from second year students during the experience; engaging in and refining interpersonal communication during client interactions; rehearsing and delivering the presentation of final recommendations; and reflection upon the overall experience.

GBA 401C. Business Consulting III. 1 credit

The First-Year Project Experience is a live project helping a client at a real organization answer an important question or achieve a significant business objective. Teams of students work together to deliver a set of well-reasoned impactful recommendations based built upon a thoughtful analysis of the relevant facts. This course is designed to provide an experiential learning opportunity through which students can develop key skill in teamwork, communication, and problem solving skills. These learning goals are supported by discussions in MGC - on the teamwork and communication aspects of the project experience; workshops on a hypothesis driven problem solving methodology used by management consultants; coaching from second year students during the experience; engaging in and refining interpersonal communication during client interactions; rehearsing and delivering the presentation of final recommendations; and reflection upon the overall experience.

GBA 411. Business Modeling. 3 credits

This course has two major objectives: to develop the ability to frame business decision problems in a way that makes them amenable to quantitative analysis and to train in fundamental quantitative analysis techniques useful for business problems. The course is structured in three parts: 1. using spreadsheets to model business decision problems. 2. solving complex decision problems involving many variables and constraints. 3. Monte Carlo simulation is introduced as a framework for understanding and analyzing uncertainty in business. Examples from different functional areas will demonstrate how the techniques taught can be applied in a practical way to a variety of settings.

GBA 412. Data Analytics. 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to utilizing data and data analytics to inform decision-making. Extracting information from data has become an integral part of modern business management, from sports teams, to Wall Street, to Silicon Valley. GBA 412 will de-mystify statistics, enabling students to thrive in a competitive market for data-based decision-making. After building core statistical and decision theoretic tools, this course will introduce you to different types of data and provide you with a set of analytical methods that apply to each. We introduce basic notions of probability and randomness, transition to data visualization techniques, and conclude with the basis of modern data science: prediction and multiple regression. Connections to other Simon classes will be emphasized, as will a hands-on approach to data analysis (laptop computers are required for every class). In the process, students learn to ask the right questions, seek out the relevant data, apply appropriate methods, and effectively communicate your insights to your target audience.

GBA 419. Leading Teams I And II. 1 credit

This sequence of courses spans fall and winter quarters and prepares Simon MBA Coaches and Workshop leaders to lead 1st project teams and problem solving groups in areas of setting expectations; establishing process; employing collaborative problem-solving frameworks; managing conflict; and giving and receiving performance feedback. The course rests on theoretical frameworks from the fields of education, psychology, and communication; its focus is the practical application of these concepts to facilitate the successful functioning of team-based problem solving and project management groups. The course provides weekly opportunity to review Workshop and Coach meeting related issues. Workshop leaders increase their mastery of business modeling and operations management concepts, and coaches improve their skills in developing presentations, managing projects and giving feedback for improved performance.

GBA 419A. Leading Teams II. 1 credit

This sequence of courses spans fall and winter quarters and prepares Simon MBA Coaches and Workshop leaders to lead 1st project teams and problem solving groups in areas of setting expectations; establishing process; employing collaborative problem-solving frameworks; managing conflict; and giving and receiving performance feedback. The course rests on theoretical frameworks from the fields of education, psychology, and communication; its focus is the practical application of these concepts to facilitate the successful functioning of team-based problem solving and project management groups. The course provides weekly opportunity to review Workshop and Coach meeting related issues. Workshop leaders increase their mastery of business modeling and operations management concepts, and coaches improve their skills in developing presentations, managing projects and giving feedback for improved performance.

GBA 441. Business Ethics. 3 credits

This course deals with business ethics and the social responsibility of business organizations. It is designed to inform decision-making about ethical challenges arising in business. It helps students identify and manage difficult ethical dilemmas they are likely to encounter in their future careers. The course is organized into four parts. It begins by looking at the place of business ethics in a competitive economy and discussing fundamental questions about the ethical responsibility of business corporations. Next, it addresses ethical issues faced by individuals in business organizations, including the complex nature of managerial responsibilities, whistle-blowing, and insider trading. It also explores the responsibilities of business corporations vis-a-vis clients, customers, and employees, discussing issues such as professional conflicts of interest in financial services, information disclosure in advertising, fairness in sales practices and in hiring and treating employees. Finally, it analyzes some ethical questions specific to business decisions in the health sector.

GBA 450. Accounting, Economics, and Finance for MS Students. 3 credits

This course is designed to present the fundamentals of economic analysis, financial accounting, and financial analysis that will serve as a foundation for concepts developed throughout subsequent courses in the Medical Management program. The objectives of this course are to enable participants to understand and productively use the principles of managerial economics and accounting information to better structure business decisions. In addition, the course will address the principles of capital budgeting. The economics section will cover foundational principles of microeconomics. The focus will be on those principles with the greatest application for managers in health care, including supply and demand, the economic model of behavior, decision-making under uncertainty, gains from trade, externalities, demand, production, and cost functions, and basics of pricing. The accounting and finance module will present skills required to interpret and analyze common financial statements, and evaluate a company's past performance and potential future performance. Specific topics of discussion will include differences in financial statements of for-profit vs. not-for-profit entities, cash vs. accrual accounting, depreciation methodologies, and capital budgeting. Capital budgeting will include net present value (NPV), pay-back, accounting rate of return (ARR) and internal rate of return (IRR).

GBA 461. Core Economics for MS Students. 3 credits

This course covers the fundamentals of economic theory, and discusses marketing-relevant applications. Specific concepts include understanding demand and demand elasticity, marginal revenue, key cost concepts (fixed costs, variable costs, marginal costs, sunk costs), profit maximization, understanding the competitive environment and strategic decision making, and net present value calculations.

GBA 462. Core Statistics for MS Students. 3 credits

This course equips MS students with statistical skills necessary for data-driven decision making. The course covers central tendency and variability, probability, binomial and normal distributions, standard scores, hypothesis testing, z and t tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression, and non-parametric tests.

GBA 462R. Core Statistics for MS Students Using R. 3 credits

This course equips MS students with statistical skills necessary for data-driven decision making. The course covers central tendency and variability, probability, binomial and normal distributions, standard scores, hypothesis testing, z and t tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression, and non-parametric tests.

GBA 463. Economics & Marketing Strategy for MS Students. 3 credits

This course introduces students to the basics of economics and marketing strategy through interactive lectures and case discussions. Consumer choice, demand curves, the impact of competition and costs form the nucleus of the economics topics. Marketing strategy builds on these consumer, competition and company considerations to understand the segmentation, targeting, positioning and promotional decisions of the firm.

GBA 464. Programming for Analytics. 3 credits

This course provides a foundation in programming within the R environment. Traditional programming concepts--operators, data structures, control structures, repetition, user-defined functions, and scoping--will be central to the learning objectives, but the concepts will be taught in context of marketing and business analytics problems related to data management and visualization. In addition to high-level programming, the students will gain a foundational understanding of how data is organized and pulled from databases, including the querying process that turns raw data into the kinds of datasets that more advanced analytics tools leverage. In the process, students will learn rudimentary SQL and the related core concepts (e.g., aggregation and joins). The course involves hands-on tutorial assignments involving practical pattern matching as well as less structured programming assignments, where the students are expected to write their own programs.

GBA 466. Accounting And Finance For MS Students. 3 credits

This course presents the basics of financial accounting, and will provide a framework for analyzing financial data, and understanding concepts developed throughout subsequent courses in the Business Analytics program. The course begins with an overview of the four financial statements, and then advances to more in depth coverage of Revenue and Expenses, Assets, Liabilities, Stockholder's Equity, and Cash Flow. The course will then survey topics in corporate finance, centered on the analysis of financial data. The course includes a survey of financial metrics used to analyze operations, then proceeds to a discussion of project evaluation with a focus on relevant cash flows, and then finishes with a discussion of the appropriate required rate of return to be used in evaluating those cash flows.

GBA 482. Business Policy. 3 credits

This capstone course focuses on how corporations and other forms of enterprise establish aims and goals, determine strategies to achieve those aims and goals and, subsequently, how those strategies are executed. Emphasis is given to the concerns of top management leaders in anticipating and reacting to changes in the economic environment, changes in the nature of market competition and how action is stimulated to produce desired responses in the enterprises they govern. The course consists of lectures and discussions supplemented by the analysis of recent complex cases involving well-known international corporations in contemporary situations. Both individual and team reports are required, and students are expected to use computer-based market forecasting and financial-simulation techniques to analyze the 'what if' problems faced by senior managers in these cases. Oral and written reports are graded on the clarity of presentation as well as the quality of analysis.

GBA 486. Intl Strategic Mgmt Tech. 3 credits

This capstone course focuses on the strategies of international corporations that seek a sustainable competitive advantage through technological innovation. Instruction consists of lectures, guest speakers from the business community and case presentations. Topics include: the definition of corporate strategy; the C.E.O.'s role as leader as well as manager; the analysis of the firm's competitive position; the development of the firm's core competencies; the management of research and development; fast-cycle product development; cross-functional teams; achieving product quality through technology; a comparative analysis of patent law in the U.S. and other countries; structuring strategic alliances between large and small firms; international joint ventures; and the acquisition of small, high-tech firms by large corporations. Student teams play the role of principals in a management consulting firm ('Simon Associates') that has been retained by the CEO of a technology-based corporation to develop strategic options and recommendations for the solution of a complex business problem with marketing, operations and financial implications. Oral presentations, management memos and written reports are graded on the clarity of presentation as well as the quality of analysis.

GBA 490. American Business Practice. 1 credit

This course is designed to give non-U.S. students an opportunity to apply business-management theories they have learned in their Simon School studies while they are assigned as interns (minimum of six weeks) with U.S. companies. Internships allow students to work in business settings/situations in which they receive on-the-job training from management personnel and gain valuable practical experience in performing professional-level tasks in their area(s) of concentration. GBA 490, which cannot be used to complete a concentration in the MBA program, is open only to non-U.S. students who are eligible to work in the United States. An eligible student, as defined by immigration regulations, is a degree candidate who has lawfully resided in the United States on visa status for at least one academic year (eight to nine months) prior to starting an internship position. Students who plan to enroll in GBA 490 must communicate with the University of Rochester's International Services Office (ISO) regarding the submission of proper documentation for employment. They should inform Simon School Career Management of their plans to seek a business internship, and they should schedule an appointment with Career Management to discuss career interests and employment-search strategies. When/if an internship is obtained, the student must meet with a GBA 490 faculty advisor to prepare a proposal describing the location and nature of the assignment and the planned functional area of study. The proposal, which will include specific learning objectives, must be approved by the faculty advisor prior to the student's acceptance of the internship. Upon completion of the internship assignment, the student must prepare a 10- to 12-page report detailing its outcome(s) and stating whether the proposed learning objectives were met.

GBA 490E. Integrating Business Theory And Practice. 1 credit

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to apply business-management theories they have learned in their Simon School studies while they are assigned as unpaid interns. These unpaid internships allow students to work in business settings and situations in which they receive on-the-job training from management personnel and gain valuable practical experience in performing professional-level tasks in their area(s) of concentration. GBA 490E, Integrating Business Theory and Practice, which cannot be used to complete a concentration in the MBA program, is open to international students who are not yet eligible to work in the United States or to any domestic student who has completed at least two quarters of study. Students should complete a GBA 490E form, meet with the Student Services director and then bring the approved paperwork to the Simon School registrars office for processing. Upon completion of the internship assignment, the student must prepare a one- to two-page report detailing the outcome(s) and stating whether the proposed learning objectives were met.

GBA 491. Reading Course. 3 credits

Offered at the discretion of individual faculty - Supervised reading and study on topics beyond those covered in existing formal courses.